How to pick the right robot for you

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                                            The Robots are coming!

        What can we say? They are accumulating everywhere. From the little                  household helpers to the sex robots, to the war robots. Oh my.

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ADULT

KIDS

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AI is going everywhere, it seems.

In Brazil, companies can see people’s reactions to their advertising on the metro by watching their faces. Yoga apparel can actually give feedback about your form and posture. (I’ll have to look into how it does that) I could make a list of all this. Maybe I should some day. But we all know that feedback is integral to the success of business. Okay. We get that. But bathrooms now?

As I said in last week’s article, Helsinki is pioneering AI in their airport bathrooms to see how it will go with their customers. So far most people are liking it. They can ‘hollar’ out for whatever it is they need and someone will be summoned to get it for them. Right away. Real time. That’s what AI is for, really. To make our lives better. But bathroom AI goes a little bit more into detail.

Helsinki airport bathrooms go into positive or negative feedback by providing a place in there for their customers to rate their experience. And it looks like people are taking advantage of that. And it is giving the AI experts, and the airport, the information they need to improve their services. They can track the number of users going in there, too. The airport can track the usage data of their bathrooms, by tracking how many people go in and out, and when they receive several complaints about anything going on in there, they can adjust their cleaning routines to take care of it. That’s pretty cool.

The goal here is to move forward into the future with technology geared toward making our lives easier. You know. Like life is for all the Star Trek characters. This is just one step toward that. And bathrooms were selected because they have. . . well. . . more challenges. Like cleanliness and the needed supplies for the customers to take care of themselves. So far, this is all the AI is being used for. But I’m wondering how it will handle an issue of someone following another person in there with terrible intentions on his/her mind. Hmm. That would be an interesting thing to find out now, wouldn’t it?

Ooohhhh, the AI bathroom.
Still no YouTube video yet.

RESCUE

RECREATION


This 8 page report tells all about the 
worries of robots taking over jobs.                 Surprisingly though, most worries are  
not necessary. About 99% of them aren’t.


HOME

Hello. We’re ordinary folk here at Robot Aficionado, and so we take a common sense approach to looking at the exciting technology of Artificial Intelligence. Robots. How exciting is it that technology today has caught up with all that science fiction we’ve been reading for so long?


Robots have been a staple in our society for a long time now. Since the third century BC, and maybe earlier, actually. One of the earliest descriptions was found in the Lie Zi text, on a much earlier encounter between King Mu of Zhou (1023–957 BC) and a mechanical engineer known as Yan Shi. He was called an 'artificer'. He allegedly presented the king with a mechanical,  life-size, human-shaped figure which he made.

Descriptions of more than 100 machines were found in writings by Ctesibius, Philo of Byzantium, Heron of Alexandria, and others in the first century AD. Heron of Alexandria wrote a book titled ‘Pneumatica and Automata’, in which he described a fire engine, a wind organ, a coin-operated machine, and a steam-powered engine. In 420 B.C.E, Archytas of Tarentum wrote about a wooden, steam propelled bird, which was able to fly. He called it the ‘Flying pigeon’. The list could go on, from a programmable band in 1206, to an automated peacock, to a mechanical knight in 1495, to the drawings of Leonardo da Vinci. There was even a mechanical duck, invented by Jacques de Vaucanson in 1738, that could eat, flap its wings and excrete. Imagine that. And Nikola Tesla put forth the first radio-controlled vessel in 1898. We have a long history of robotics.

The word robot comes from the Slavic word robota, which means labor. The word robotics, then, was derived from the word robot. The word robotics was first introduced in a play written by the Czech writer Karel Capek, called RUR, which is Rossum’s Universal Robots. It was published in 1920. The play is about a factory that made human looking robots. But according to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word robotics was first used in print by Isaac Asimov in his science fiction short story ‘Liar!’, which was published in 1941, May issue of Astounding Science Fiction. In 1942, he created the three laws of robotics, which are still in use today. They are:
1. Robots must never harm human beings.
2. Robots must follow instructions from humans without violating rule 1.
3. Robots must protect themselves without violating the other rules.
In 1948, Norbert Wiener formulated the principles of cybernetics, the basis of practical robotics.

Commercial and industrial robots are all over the place today. They can perform jobs more cheaply, more accurately and more reliably, than humans. They’re used in jobs which are too dirty, dangerous, or dull for humans. Robots are used in manufacturing, assembly, packing and packaging, mining, transport, earth and space exploration, surgery, weaponry, laboratory research, safety, and the mass production of consumer and industrial goods. Just to name a few.


As we go along, we'll have more articles for you to browse through for more information on the progress of the robot industry.  We'll take a look at robots for kids. Sex robots, for sure. Those for sale, in space, and in the military. You name it. We'll even discuss sometime about whether or not those buggers are taking over. Who knows?


Here is our feature article for this week: 


​PS: Sign up for our weekly newsletter. The form is down at the bottom of the page here. You'll get a free report if you do. Robots vs Jobs. Interesting stuff.

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