What is so ‘Nature’ about robots?

Well to answer that, I can only give you one example right now. This will be short and sweet. It’s the BionicFinWave. What is that, you say? It’s a robotic fish that can swim in any water to go down and check on any mechanism any company has decided it needed down there. It’s quite interesting, actually.

An automation tech company called Festo, in Germany, used nature as inspiration for this thing. The cuttlefish, to be exact. With a little bit of the Nile perch thrown in. A cuttlefish is, as quoted from Wikipedia:

‘Cuttlefish, or cuttles, are marine animals of the order Sepiida. They belong to the class Cephalopoda, which also includes squid, octopi, and nautili. Cuttlefish have a unique internal shell, the cuttlebone. Despite their name, cuttlefish are not fish but molluscs. They have large, W-shaped pupils, eight arms, and two tentacles furnished with denticulated suckers, with which they secure their prey. They generally range in size from 15 to 25 cm (6 to 10 in), with the largest species, Sepia apama, reaching 50 cm (20 in) in mantle length and over 10.5 kg (23 lb) in mass. Their habitat is wherever there is warm ocean water. Except around the Americas. Since the cuttlefish originated overseas, scientists believe the ocean waters were too cold for the animal to cross.

Cuttlefish eat small molluscs, crabs, shrimp, fish, octopus, worms, and other cuttlefish. Their predators include dolphins, sharks, fish, seals, seabirds, and other cuttlefish. The average life expectancy of a cuttlefish is about 1-2 years. Recent studies indicate cuttlefish are among the most intelligent invertebrates. Cuttlefish also have one of the largest brain-to-body size ratios of all invertebrates.’ 

They are highly intelligent, throw ink when alarmed, can turn on a dime, and move in any direction as quickly as a heartbeat. In other words, they can mimic perfectly any UFO you may have seen up in the sky. This is what Festo was after.

Festo wanted an underwater bot that could move through the water with undulating fins, swimming while barely churning the water. The bot has two side fins, made from flexible silicon, that can move independently of each other so it can turn or dive when it needs to. Just like real fish can. The rest of its components were 3D printed. The company wanted it to track the depth of the water and sense the distance from other objects it was approaching. And to gather information about whatever piece of equipment it was sent out to examine. All sent back to the company wirelessly. Festo has accomplished all this. Seems like, pretty soon, we’ll be seeing these little critters in our oceans all over the place.

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                                            The Robots are coming!

        What can we say? They are accumulating everywhere. From the little                  household helpers to the sex robots, to the war robots. Oh my.

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Back to 3D printing again
Check out the ‘fish’ here


This 8 page report tells all about the 
worries of robots taking over jobs.                 Surprisingly though, most worries are  
not necessary. About 99% of them aren’t.


Archived articles

Bringing ordinary folk into the future

Hello. We’re ordinary folk here at Robot Aficionado, and so we take a common sense approach to looking at the exciting technology of Artificial Intelligence. Robots. How exciting is it that technology today has caught up with all that science fiction we’ve been reading for so long?


Robots have been a staple in our society for a long time now. Since the third century BC, and maybe earlier, actually. One of the earliest descriptions was found in the Lie Zi text, on a much earlier encounter between King Mu of Zhou (1023–957 BC) and a mechanical engineer known as Yan Shi. He was called an 'artificer'. He allegedly presented the king with a mechanical,  life-size, human-shaped figure which he made.

Descriptions of more than 100 machines were found in writings by Ctesibius, Philo of Byzantium, Heron of Alexandria, and others in the first century AD. Heron of Alexandria wrote a book titled ‘Pneumatica and Automata’, in which he described a fire engine, a wind organ, a coin-operated machine, and a steam-powered engine. In 420 B.C.E, Archytas of Tarentum wrote about a wooden, steam propelled bird, which was able to fly. He called it the ‘Flying pigeon’. The list could go on, from a programmable band in 1206, to an automated peacock, to a mechanical knight in 1495, to the drawings of Leonardo da Vinci. There was even a mechanical duck, invented by Jacques de Vaucanson in 1738, that could eat, flap its wings and excrete. Imagine that. And Nikola Tesla put forth the first radio-controlled vessel in 1898. We have a long history of robotics.

The word robot comes from the Slavic word robota, which means labor. The word robotics, then, was derived from the word robot. The word robotics was first introduced in a play written by the Czech writer Karel Capek, called RUR, which is Rossum’s Universal Robots. It was published in 1920. The play is about a factory that made human looking robots. But according to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word robotics was first used in print by Isaac Asimov in his science fiction short story ‘Liar!’, which was published in 1941, May issue of Astounding Science Fiction. In 1942, he created the three laws of robotics, which are still in use today. They are:
1. Robots must never harm human beings.
2. Robots must follow instructions from humans without violating rule 1.
3. Robots must protect themselves without violating the other rules.
In 1948, Norbert Wiener formulated the principles of cybernetics, the basis of practical robotics.

Commercial and industrial robots are all over the place today. They can perform jobs more cheaply, more accurately and more reliably, than humans. They’re used in jobs which are too dirty, dangerous, or dull for humans. Robots are used in manufacturing, assembly, packing and packaging, mining, transport, earth and space exploration, surgery, weaponry, laboratory research, safety, and the mass production of consumer and industrial goods. Just to name a few.


As we go along, we'll have more articles for you to browse through for more information on the progress of the robot industry.  We'll take a look at robots for kids. Sex robots, for sure. Those for sale, in space, and in the military. You name it. We'll even discuss sometime about whether or not those buggers are taking over. Who knows?


Here is our feature article for this week: 


​PS: Sign up for our weekly newsletter. The form is down at the bottom of the page here. You'll get a free report if you do. Robots vs Jobs. Interesting stuff.

How to pick the right robot for you

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